Exploring the work and world of György Gordon

There is only one month left to enjoy 'György Gordon (1924-2005) A retrospective'. Find out more about the exhibition, and exciting upcoming events in this blog.

'György Gordon (1924-1005) A retrospective'
The exhibition explores the life and work of Hungarian-born painter György Gordon. Gordon settled in Wakefield after escaping as a refugee from Hungary during the autumn of 1956. The exhibition includes paintings and drawings spanning the 1950s-1990s reflecting on Gordon's life and artistic journey, from his experience as a refugee to later work exploring isolation, alienation, and old age.

We have two exciting talks coming up to give even further context to the exhibition before it closes. On the 15th February Dr James Hamilton, author of the catalogue essay, is joining us to give a free lecture that will explore Gordon's Hungarian roots, and touch on the influences he received in Hungary, and in Britain from some of his fellow Hungarians who were also forced to flee their country. This talk is free, but spaces are limited so book a space on Eventbrite.

Peter Murray at Yorkshire Sculpture Park. (Background) Jonathan Borofsky, Molecule Man 1+1+1, 1990. Private Collection courtesy YSP © Marc Atkins. Image courtesy Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Photo © Jonty Wilde



Peter Murray at Yorkshire Sculpture Park. (Background) Jonathan Borofsky, Molecule Man 1+1+1, 1990. Private Collection courtesy YSP © Marc Atkins. Image courtesy Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Photo © Jonty Wilde'

The second special talk we have in February is from Peter Murray CBE, founding and Executive Director of Yorkshire Sculpture Park. On 20th February Peter Murray will talk about his friend and collaborator György Gordon and the evolution of culture in Wakefield and across West Yorkshire. This event will also include a Q&A session where audience questions are welcomed. This talk is free, but spaces are limited so book a space on Eventbrite.

  • Facebook icon
  • Twitter icon

There is no response to “Exploring the work and world of György Gordon”

Tags